Sunday, November 15, 2015

PHOTOGRAPHING MY ART WORK

BEFORE with glass glare.



AFTER with my invention.
                                                                                                 TOY SOLDIER   

 I learn everything the hard way with many hours used up by the learning curve. That is why I dearly love U Tube; have question will find answer!

I take all of my own photos, some are good and some not so much but I do realize the importance of quality photography when you are posting them on a blog site, web site or Daily Paint Works.
Some of my earlier works were professionally framed before I realize it was prudent to get photos prior to framing. I choose my frames to enhance my art work and not for a generic frame that the public will like. A good example is Toy Soldier (colored inks). Not all clients would love a deep purple frame with a notched mat but I love it.

All of my framed paintings under glass had a reflection of something in the photo. (see before example) I know enough not to use a flash.

To solve this problem I went to U Tube to find a simple answer that did not cost too much, here is what I invented from things I have around the house:

* I photograph out on the covered porch to get indirect natural light. I learned that from Carol Marine's  section on photographing art work in her book Daily Painting.

* I happen to have an older camera and tripod that I set up parallel to my adjustable wooden easel. It was easier and more stable to place the easel on a table and do the adjustments with the tripod and camera.





* Next I needed a reflection blocker so I made it out of heavy cardboard which I covered with a dark fabric from my fabric stash. Cut a hole in the center and off we go.  At the moment I have not found something to hold the reflector as I push the button so I just hold it with my left hand.
 
*I did make a second blocker from card stock which fits over the camera lens as it telescopes out to take the picture.   






*Put the camera setting on close up, adjust the height of lens to the art work and take numerous shots.
*Upload onto the computer and edit as much as I can with just the I Mac tools.

I'm so proud of me:)